This Blog is Driven by Inspiration

27 May 2010

The Magic of Black and White – Part II

There is nothing like the simplistic beauty of a black and white photograph. Many photographers would even go so far as to argue that black and white photography is more challenging than color. Last month we had the privilege of reading The Magic of Black and White by Andrew S. Gibson, the first of a two-part ebook series which touches on the foundations for creating stunning black and white images. Andrew taught us the techniques that professionals use for photographing evocative photos in black and white, in an easy to understand fashion. Today, Andrew releases the second ebook in this series:
The Magic of Black and White Part II.

The Magic of Black and White Part II picks up right where it should and enters the realm of how to properly process images for black and white. One of the things I most enjoyed is the section on “Interpreting the Image” where we see a color photo interpreted into several black and white “versions.” I personally use this technique quite often in finding the right process to fit the particular photograph I am working with. As Andrew explains, there is no one way to process a photograph for black and white. Each image is different and requires its own interpretation.

Andrew also goes into great detail, sharing with us his personally developed methods for processing images in black and white. What’s great is that the processing techniques demonstrated in this ebook can be applied throughout almost any post-processing software.

The section of the ebook which deals with toning was especially helpful. In post-processing, toning techniques are what truly infuse an image with mood, feeling, and ambiance. After a brief discussion on toning, Andrew dives into some post-processing techniques and shows us an effective method of applying both strong and subtle toning.

The Magic of Black and White Part II also explores three real-world examples of black and white processing from start to finish. One of these examples covers the proper use of textures in black and white photography, one of the most effective methods of adding drama to an image. If you aren’t yet familiar with textures, you will definitely want to pick up this ebook and learn the technique. Textures alone can open a whole new door to a new style of processing, a new genre if you will.

Quote from David duChemin – “Part two of Andrew S. Gibson’s, The Magic of Black and White series is about the craft of converting the captured image into black and white in the digital darkroom. Where Part One – Vision, looked at the process of seeing and capturing in monochrome, Part Two – Craft, looks at the tools needed to turn a colour digital negative into a spectacular-looking black and white image using the software of the digital darkroom, specifically Adobe Photoshop. The Magic of Black and White, Part Two – Craft is a 51 page downloadable PDF. We’ve forced the layout into a landscape format to make viewing on the iPad even better. Using a good PDF reader like GoodReader, these PDF eBooks retain the rich layouts we’ve always created, as well as allowing non-iPad users the same great experience they’ve always had. It sells for the usual and ridiculous price of USD$5.00″

To get your copy of The Magic of Black and White Part II, visit the Craft and Vision Photography eBook store. At 51 pages in length and only $5, The Magic of Black and White Part II is worth every penny. A comprehensive and practical guide to processing images in black and white, in an easy to understand format with example images that truly inspire.

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1 Response

  1. Joseph mccullough

    Would this book be good for someone who does not take pictures but is wanting to see when certain effects should be applied when editing photos?

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